2017-12-20 / Letters

Racism met with silence

Dear Editor:

In June 2011, would-be senator Roy Moore said, during a radio interview, that getting rid of all but the first 10 amendments to the Constitution would solve many of today's problems. Among the amendments Mr. Moore would get rid of are the 13th amendment, which abolished slavery; the 14th amendment, which guaranteed black people the equal protection under the law; and the 15th amendment, which guaranteed black people the right to vote.

In November 2017, Mr. Moore said in public that America was great during the days of slavery, because families stayed together and were strong. That, of course, applied only to white families, because white slave owners broke up black families as part of their business selling black skinned human beings.

And in November 2017, Mr. Moore said in public that "new rights" created in 1965 caused many of today's problems. The "new rights" were in the Civil Rights Act of 1965 which outlawed racial discrimination in employment and the Voting Rights Act, which created a mechanism for combating racial discrimination in voting.

None of Mr. Moore's statements, however, has figured in the discussion among political leaders about why Roy Moore is not fit to hold office, or why he is a disgrace to the Republican party. That discussion focused entirely on the accusations of nine white women regarding sexual misconduct verging on pedophilia by Moore some 30 years ago.

To summarize, complaints by white people about inappropriate sexual misconduct 30 years ago: disqualifying. Recent racist statements: nearly complete silence.

And people wonder why Colin Kaepernick, and others, have felt it necessary to take a knee before a football game to call attention to persistent racism in our country.

Garry Geffert

Martinsburg

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