2017-12-06 / School News

County teachers get over $7,000 in mini-grants from foundation

by Kate Evans


Seventeen Morgan County teachers from five schools received mini-grants from the Eastern West Virginia Community Foundation. Pictured at the foundation’s November 30 awards reception in Martinsburg are teachers (kneeling-left to right) Adam Keeling, Rebecca Lindsey, Gillian Anderson, Kelsea Reed and Beth Smith. Standing in back are Robert Wallace, Charles Wilson, Shanahan Elmore, Jaclyn Snyder, Trista Crawford and Megan Lord. photo by Michael Whalton Seventeen Morgan County teachers from five schools received mini-grants from the Eastern West Virginia Community Foundation. Pictured at the foundation’s November 30 awards reception in Martinsburg are teachers (kneeling-left to right) Adam Keeling, Rebecca Lindsey, Gillian Anderson, Kelsea Reed and Beth Smith. Standing in back are Robert Wallace, Charles Wilson, Shanahan Elmore, Jaclyn Snyder, Trista Crawford and Megan Lord. photo by Michael Whalton A total of $7,182 in minigrants was given to Morgan County teachers by The Eastern West Virginia Community Foundation. Seventeen county teachers received awards that ranged from $200 to $500 for classroom or school-wide projects at five schools at a November 30 awards ceremony.

Morgan County teachers and officials were excited to receive the grants, which will aid math, science, English, reading, music, art, physical education and other classroom programs and school efforts.

Paw Paw Elementary music teacher Robert Wallace got $500 for ukuleles for the elementary classroom. The school also received a $100 Susan Landis Outstanding Mini-Grant Award from Wallace’s grant. Paw Paw Elementary teacher Adam Keeling received $330 for math enrichment stations and teacher Shanna Poniris got $490 for android tablets.

Warm Springs Intermediate School teacher mini-grant awards went to Shanahan Elmore for Digging into a Dino-mite Adventure ($378); Christina Rose for Guiding our Way to a Mathematical Mindset ($420); Marianna Ruggiero for art/kiln furniture ($423.50); Susan Thomas for library/media center Makerspace ($300); Jennifer Fox for The Community We Built-Art in Action ($437); Margaret Hill for Building Characters Through Picture Books ($417) and Kelsea Reed for English Language Arts/Kindles ($445).

Warm Springs Middle School teacher Charles Wilson received a $475.50 minigrant for science/standard metric measurement and safety and middle school teacher Gillian Anderson got $400 for her Academic Differentiation via Diverse Technology project.

Pleasant View Elementary music teacher Beth Smith received a $493 mini-grant for karate recorders for everyone.

Widmyer Elementary teacher mini-grants were awarded to Trista Crawford for classroom technology for all ($424); Jaclyn Snyder for 21st Classroom learning for All Students ($351); Megan Lord for physical education- Teaching Our Children a Healthy Lifestyle ($500); and Rebecca Lindsey for ESGI software ($200).

Widmyer Elementary also received a $100 Susan Landis Outstanding Mini-Grant Award for Lindsey’s photo of her kindergarten students using e-tablets she received from last year’s mini-grant that was featured on the cover of the Eastern West Virginia Community Foundation’s 22nd Annual Report to the Community.

Eastern West Virginia Community Foundation Executive Director Michael Whalton said their teacher mini-grants program grew from $12,349 in mini-grants to Berkeley County teachers in their first year in 2013 to $44,085 in mini-grants to teachers in 46 public schools in Berkeley, Morgan, Jefferson and Hampshire counties in November, 2017. It is their most popular and successful grant program.

Whalton credited former Beckley Area Foundation Director

Susan Landis for inspiring their mini-grant program. Landis told him in 2013 that it was her favorite foundation program and enthusiastically described its phenomenal impact. Landis passed away this year and Whalton’s foundation began the Outstanding Mini-Grant (OMG) award in her memory.

Whalton said that the teacher mini-grants program is the most rewarding of all of their grant programs because of the remarkable impact the grants have on students in the classroom.

“No one is more appreciative of getting $500 than teachers,” he noted.

"It just goes to show how hard our teachers are working and how committed and creative they are when it comes to their classes. This is also an example of how we look for additional sources of revenue for our schools. We are trying to provide students with the very best while being responsible stewards of local and state tax dollars," Morgan County Schools Superintendent Erich May said.

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