2017-11-29 / School News

Extreme Science show captures the imagination with fact and magic

by Kate Evans


Paw Paw Elementary fifth graders Sierra Henderson and Julius Watson help magician David Hagerman with his in-line skating display of the laws of energy in his November 9 Extreme Science show. The Morgan Arts Council sponsored his Adopt-a-School program that was featured in all county schools. Paw Paw Elementary fifth graders Sierra Henderson and Julius Watson help magician David Hagerman with his in-line skating display of the laws of energy in his November 9 Extreme Science show. The Morgan Arts Council sponsored his Adopt-a-School program that was featured in all county schools. Magician David Hagerman dazzled county students with his original and zany Extreme Science comedy and magic show that demonstrates the laws of motion, energy, electricity and chemistry through fun-filled, hands-on experiments, some with audience participation.

Hagerman performed a solo show from November 7 through November 9 at all Morgan County Schools as part of the Morgan Arts Council Adopt-a-School program. Hagerman and an assistant did a November 8 expanded Extreme Science evening community show to a standing-room only crowd at the Ice House.

Hagerman, who hails from Branson, Missouri, combined his love of magic and science as a magician and has been performing for schools across the country since 1994. He has been doing his Extreme Science show for 20 years. Hagerman also performs his Vaudeville Magic show at theme parks and fairs and has entertained millions with his humorous and educational performances.


Hagerman the Magician enlists the help of Paw Paw Elementary fourth grader Taylor Carder to light up a fluorescent light bulb in his November 9 Extreme Science show. Hagerman did an expanded Extreme Science evening community show on November 8 to a packed crowd at the Ice House. Hagerman the Magician enlists the help of Paw Paw Elementary fourth grader Taylor Carder to light up a fluorescent light bulb in his November 9 Extreme Science show. Hagerman did an expanded Extreme Science evening community show on November 8 to a packed crowd at the Ice House. At a November 9 Paw Paw Elementary show, Hagerman the Magician clowned, kidded and enthralled students while showing where science and magic meet through feats that ranged from the magic of lighting an unplugged fluorescent light bulb to chemical reactions that surrounded a towel with flames while it wasn’t burning and made water disappear that was in a cup balanced on a student’s head.

While wearing in-line skates and using a huge bungee cord slingshot, Hagerman entertainingly illustrated the difference between kinetic energy (the energy of movement) versus potential energy or stored energy, with the help of several students.

Hagerman liquefied a Styrofoam cup and added the remains to a giant ball of recycled Styrofoam he’s been collecting from every Extreme Science show he’s done for 20 years. He also balanced a spinning wheel in his hand and explained the forces that kept it upright for a time.

Hagerman shared the scientific concepts behind his routines and evoked delight in the crowd with his gravity, chemistry, electricity and physics experiments and the stunning helium balloon display that ended his show.

Throughout his performance, Hagerman stressed the safety precautions that he always takes in his shows and urged kids to never play with fire or electricity or to try these things at home.

Before his Paw Paw Schools performance, Hagerman said that he was always interested in science and that he became interested in magic as a child. Hagerman got books from the library and learned the science behind the tricks and how and why they worked it and called himself a science wizard.

Hagerman said magic is all based on science and that all magicians hide the science. In his Extreme Science show, he shows the science and does a few magic tricks as well.

Hagerman said his role “is to engage and excite students about science, get kids to embrace it and consider going into it.”

Funding for Extreme Science came in part from the National Endowment for the Arts, the West Virginia Commission on the Arts, the Eastern West Virginia Community Foundation and FAST.

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