2017-08-30 / Opinions

This Week in West Virginia History

from The West Virginia Encyclopedia West Virginia Humanities Council 1310 Kanawha Blvd., E. Charleston, WV 25301

West Virginia Humanities Council 1310 Kanawha Blvd., E. Charleston, WV 25301

August 30, 1862 - Confederate raiders under the command of General Albert G. Jenkins attacked and occupied Buckhannon, where they captured 20 prisoners and 5,000 stands of small arms.

August 31, 1945 - The USS West Virginia led American battleships into Tokyo Bay two days before the formal surrender of Japan on September 2, 1945.

September 1, 1777 - Fort Henry, located at what is now Wheeling, was attacked by Indians for the first time. Nearly half the militia were lured outside the post and killed.

September 1, 1907 - Walter Phillips Reuther was born to German immigrant parents in Wheeling. Reuther was a founder of the modern labor movement and a long-time president of the United Auto Workers.

September 1, 1921 - By this date during the Battle of Blair Mountain, miners had captured half of the 25-mile mountain ridge and were ready to descend upon Logan. President Warren Harding placed the strike zone under martial law, and ordered federal troops and a bombing squadron into the state.

September 2, 1722 - Frontiersman William Crawford was born in present Jefferson County. He was a farmer, soldier, surveyor, and the land agent of George Washington.

September 3, 1890 - West Virginia Wesleyan College opened as the West Virginia Conference Seminary. In that first year, 201 men and women undertook a largely preparatory school curriculum. Gradually the school added college-level studies and awarded its first five degrees in 1905.

September 3, 1966 - President Lyndon B. Johnson dedicated the Summersville Dam and Lake. Summersville Lake, located on the Gauley River in Nicholas County, is West Virginia’s largest lake, with 2,790 surface acres at summer pool stage and 60 miles of shoreline.

September 4, 1862 - General Albert G. Jenkins and his men crossed the Ohio River and became the first to raise the Confederate flag on Ohio soil.

September 5, 1861 - Sutton was occupied by 5,000 Union troops. Later in 1861, General Rosecrans bivouacked 10,000 Union troops there, including a future president, William McKinley.



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