2017-06-28 / Opinions

This Week in West Virginia History

from The West Virginia Encyclopedia

West Virginia Humanities Council 1310 Kanawha Blvd., E. Charleston, WV 25301

June 28, 1936 - Athlete Charles Louis ‘‘Chuck’’ Howley was born in Wheeling, Howley played linebacker for 12 seasons for the Dallas Cowboys. He was named All-Pro six times and named to six Pro Bowls.

June 28, 2010 - Robert C. Byrd died at the age of 92. He was first elected to the U.S. Senate in 1958, and he served until his death.

June 29, 2012 - A violent storm called a derecho raced across West Virginia, leaving downed trees and damaged homes in its wake. About 688,000 homes and businesses lost power for a week during a widespread heat wave.

June 30, 1914 - Statewide prohibition became law years before it became law for the whole nation.

June 30, 1944 - Harpers Ferry National Historical Park was authorized as a national monument, the first in West Virginia.

July 1, 1861 - Francis Pierpont, governor of the Reorganized Government of Virginia, called the legislature into session. The general assembly re-established governmental functions, provided for the raising of military units, and elected new U.S. senators and representatives.

July 1, 1937 - Watoga State Park was opened to the public. The park in Pocahontas County is the largest of the state parks and among the oldest.

July 1, 1971 - Southern West Virginia Community College was formed by joining the Marshall University branch campuses at Logan and Williamson. In 1995, the name changed to Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College.

July 2, 1829 - Potter and businessman Alexander Polk Donaghho was born. He began pottery operation in Parkersburg, creating handthrown, saltglazed crocks, jars and other pottery that are avidly collected today.

July 3, 1863 - At Gettysburg, Union troopers in the 1st West Virginia Cavalry took part in a fruitless cavalry charge against Confederate infantrymen during the waning moments of that great battle.

July 4, 1928 - West Virginia dedicated Droop Mountain Battlefield State Park. Droop Mountain was the site of one of the most important Civil War battles fought on West Virginia soil.

July 4, 1938 - Musician Bill Withers, Jr. was born into a miner’s family of 13 children in Slab Fork, Raleigh County. In 1971, Withers released his first album, Just As I Am, including his first Grammy-winning song, “Ain’t No Sunshine.” In 2015 he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.




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